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What is Cancer and What Causes It?

What is Cancer?

Cancer, known medically as a malignant neoplasm, is a broad group of diseases involving unregulated cell growth. In cancer, cells divide and grow uncontrollably, forming malignant tumors, and invading nearby parts of the body. The cancer may also spread to more distant parts of the body through the lymphatic system or bloodstream. Not all tumors are cancerous; benign tumors do not invade neighboring tissues and do not spread throughout the body. There are over 200 different known cancers that affect humans.

The causes of cancer are diverse, complex, and only partially understood. Many things are known to increase the risk of cancer, including tobacco use, dietary factors, certain infections, exposure to radiation, lack of physical activity, obesity, and environmental pollutants. These factors can directly damage genes or combine with existing genetic faults within cells to cause cancerous mutations. Approximately 5–10% of cancers can be traced directly to inherited genetic defects. Many cancers could be prevented by not smoking, eating more vegetables, fruits and whole grains, eating less meat and refined carbohydrates, maintaining a healthy weight, exercising, minimizing sunlight exposure, and being vaccinated against some infectious diseases.

Cancer can be detected in a number of ways, including the presence of certain signs and symptoms, screening tests, or medical imaging. Once a possible cancer is detected it is diagnosed by microscopic examination of a tissue sample. Cancer is usually treated with chemotherapy, radiation therapy and surgery. The chances of surviving the disease vary greatly by the type and location of the cancer and the extent of disease at the start of treatment. While cancer can affect people of all ages, and a few types of cancer are more common in children, the risk of developing cancer generally increases with age. In 2007, cancer caused about 13% of all human deaths worldwide (7.9 million). Rates are rising as more people live to an old age and as mass lifestyle changes occur in the developing world.

The chances of surviving the disease vary greatly by the diet and the extent of disease at the start of treatment. While cancer can affect people of all ages, and a few types of cancer are more common in children, the risk of developing cancer generally increases with age.

In 2007, cancer caused only 13% of all human deaths worldwide (7.9 million) but nearly 30% in the junk food western countries.

Rates are rising as more people live to an old age and as mass junk food lifestyle changes occur in the developing world.

Percentage of patients deceased within five years after diagnosis:

 

Pancreatic cancer – 94%Leukemia – 44%Kidney cancer – 28.2%
Liver cancer – 83.9%Laryngeal cancer – 39.4%Bladder cancer – 22.1%
Lung cancer – 83.4%Oral cancer – 37.8%Uterine cancer – 18.5%
Esophageal cancer – 82.7%Colon cancer – 35.1%Breast cancer – 10.8%
Stomach cancer – 72.3%Bone cancer – 33.6%Skin cancer – 8.7%
Brain cancer – 66.5%Rectal cancer – 33.5%Thyroid cancer – 2.3%
Ovarian cancer – 55.8%Cervical cancer – 32.1%Prostate cancer – 0.8%

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M Williams

In your cancer diet plan, do you plan your diet inclusive of your blood and nutritional type? Do you or your research support that eating for your blood type has any bearing of disease states that manifest?

I really want a genuine response and look forward to your giving one. Thank you for your time and anticipated comments/sharing information.